Newly Published
Clinical Focus Review  |   July 2020
Perioperative Temperature Monitoring
Author Notes
  • From the Department of Outcomes Research, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio.
  • Submitted for publication May 21, 2020. Accepted for publication June 29, 2020.
    Submitted for publication May 21, 2020. Accepted for publication June 29, 2020.×
  • Correspondence: Address correspondence to Dr. Sessler: Department of Outcomes Research, Anesthesiology Institute, Cleveland Clinic, 9500 Euclid Ave — P77, Cleveland, Ohio 44195. DS@OR.org. Anesthesiology’s articles are made freely accessible to all readers, for personal use only, 6 months from the cover date of the issue.
Article Information
Coagulation and Transfusion / Gastrointestinal and Hepatic Systems / Patient Safety / Respiratory System / Technology / Equipment / Monitoring / Clinical Focus Review
Clinical Focus Review   |   July 2020
Perioperative Temperature Monitoring
Anesthesiology Newly Published on July 28, 2020. doi:https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000003481
Anesthesiology Newly Published on July 28, 2020. doi:https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000003481
Body temperature is among the classical vital signs, and for good reason, since thermal perturbations both cause and indicate disease. Aside from infectious fever, hypothermia during surgery is the most common temperature disturbance. Temperature monitoring and thermal management are therefore key responsibilities for anesthesia professionals. Detailed reviews of thermoregulation,1  heat balance,2  and consequences and treatment of hypothermia3  have been published in this journal. There are dozens of clinical indications for temperature measurement, but this review will focus on those most relevant to anesthesia.
Normal human core body averages about 37°C. However, there is a superimposed circadian rhythm with roughly a 1°C range. Normal core body temperature thus varies from ≈36.5°C (usually about 3:00 am) to ≈37.5°C (usually about 3:00 pm).4  In premenopausal women, there are also superimposed changes in temperature with the menstrual cycle, with core temperature being about 0.5°C greater during the luteal phase.