Newly Published
Correspondence  |   July 2020
Suture-catheters Compared with Traditional Catheters: Reply
Author Notes
  • University of California San Diego, San Diego, California (J.J.F.) jfinneran@ucsd.edu
  • Accepted for publication June 23, 2020.
    Accepted for publication June 23, 2020.×
Article Information
Correspondence
Correspondence   |   July 2020
Suture-catheters Compared with Traditional Catheters: Reply
Anesthesiology Newly Published on July 28, 2020. doi:https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000003470
Anesthesiology Newly Published on July 28, 2020. doi:https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000003470
We agree with Drs. Wardhan and Nimma that the suture-catheter system is simpler in design than conventional through-the-needle catheters and that no system will be perfect in design, ergonomics, or ease of placement.1  However, our experience with the catheter insertion system differs from their suggestion that relative to a straight needle, the suture shape is more difficult to visualize. As our study progressed, we were somewhat surprised to discover that the 19-gauge suture needle visualized at least as well, if not better, than a Tuohy needle of the same gauge. Drs. Wardhan and Nimma note that “lateral forces exerted on [a] straight needle tip leading to curvature may lead to an unpredictable needle trajectory which cannot always be assumed to be straight or even in a single two-dimensional plane.” We concur and suggest that the suture-shaped needle remains within a two-dimensional plane precisely because of its curvature, which appears to greatly strengthen the needle: It is extraordinarily rigid and resists bending laterally (in a direction other than its curvature).