Newly Published
Correspondence  |   July 2020
Subomohyoid–Suprascapular versus Interscalene Block: Comment
Author Notes
  • Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technical University of Munich, Munich, Germany. Ellis.muggleton@gmail.com
  • Accepted for publication June 19, 2020.
    Accepted for publication June 19, 2020.×
  • This letter was sent to the author of the original article referenced above, who declined to respond.—Evan D. Kharasch, M.D., Ph.D., Editor-in-Chief.
    This letter was sent to the author of the original article referenced above, who declined to respond.—Evan D. Kharasch, M.D., Ph.D., Editor-in-Chief.×
Article Information
Correspondence
Correspondence   |   July 2020
Subomohyoid–Suprascapular versus Interscalene Block: Comment
Anesthesiology Newly Published on July 20, 2020. doi:https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000003467
Anesthesiology Newly Published on July 20, 2020. doi:https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000003467
While we welcome research into regional anesthesia in order to improve the quality of our medical provision, the study by Abdallah et al. demonstrates highly relevant problems in research in this area.1  First, the authors describe the interscalene block as one that poses dangers to certain populations. This may be true for a minority of patients such as those with severe respiratory impairment, but the vast majority of patients are not restricted by any ensuing respiratory compromise. Studies of healthy patients demonstrate that the phrenic nerve palsy is of no clinical relevance.2  Given that 2.5 yr in three hospitals were required to obtain the 136 patients in this study, there does not appear to be a large group of patients likely to benefit from a new block.