Editorial  |   September 2020
Fluid Fasting in Children: Solid Science?
Author Notes
  • From the Department of Anesthesiology, Pharmacology, Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine, University Hospitals of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland (L.V.); and the Department of Anaesthesia and Murdoch Children’s Research Institute, Royal Children’s Hospital, Melbourne, Australia (A.D.).
  • This editorial accompanies the article on p. 523.
    This editorial accompanies the article on p. 523.×
  • Accepted for publication May 12, 2020. Published online first on July 20, 2020.
    Accepted for publication May 12, 2020. Published online first on July 20, 2020.×
  • Address correspondence to Dr. Vutskits: laszlo.vutskits@hcuge.ch
Article Information
Editorial / Pediatric Anesthesia
Editorial   |   September 2020
Fluid Fasting in Children: Solid Science?
Anesthesiology 9 2020, Vol.133, 493-494. doi:https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000003406
Anesthesiology 9 2020, Vol.133, 493-494. doi:https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000003406
Attitudes toward restricting preoperative clear fluid intake in children are changing, and this has been reflected in an increasing number of pediatric anesthesia societies and academic institutions recommending shorter fasting times in children.1  This ongoing paradigm shift is led by an increasing sense that prolonged fasting is potentially unnecessary, contrary to patient-centered care, and may be associated with increased risk of poorer outcomes. There are several recent studies that suggest reducing fasting times for clear fluids does not increase aspiration-related events, but apart from increasing child satisfaction, few if any data show clinically relevant benefits. Indeed, it remains to be determined whether the expected psychologic and physiologic gains from reduced fasting in children translate into measurable and pertinent endpoints.