Newly Published
Editorial  |   June 2020
Dexmedetomidine and Cognitive Dysfunction after Critical Illness: What Can (and Cannot) Be Extrapolated from Rodent Models
Author Notes
  • From the Department of Surgery and Emory Critical Care Center, Emory University School of Medicine (C.W.P., C.M.C.); and Lieutenant Medical Corps, United States Navy, Naval Reserve Officer Training Corps (C.W.P.), Atlanta, Georgia.
  • Accepted for publication April 30, 2020.
    Accepted for publication April 30, 2020.×
  • The views expressed in this article reflect the results of research conducted by the author and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of the Department of the Navy, Department of Defense, nor the United States Government. Dr. Paterson is a military service member or federal/contracted employee of the United States Government. This work was prepared as part of his official duties. Title 17 U.S.C. 105 provides that “copyright protection under this title is not available for any work of the United States Government.” Title 17 U.S.C. 101 defines U.S. Government work as work prepared by a military service member or employee of the U.S. Government as part of that person’s official duties.
    The views expressed in this article reflect the results of research conducted by the author and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of the Department of the Navy, Department of Defense, nor the United States Government. Dr. Paterson is a military service member or federal/contracted employee of the United States Government. This work was prepared as part of his official duties. Title 17 U.S.C. 105 provides that “copyright protection under this title is not available for any work of the United States Government.” Title 17 U.S.C. 101 defines U.S. Government work as work prepared by a military service member or employee of the U.S. Government as part of that person’s official duties.×
  • This editorial accompanies the article on p. XXX.
    This editorial accompanies the article on p. XXX.×
  • Correspondenc: Address correspondence to Dr. Coopersmith: cmcoop3@emory.edu
Article Information
Editorial / Critical Care / Geriatric Anesthesia / Pharmacology
Editorial   |   June 2020
Dexmedetomidine and Cognitive Dysfunction after Critical Illness: What Can (and Cannot) Be Extrapolated from Rodent Models
Anesthesiology Newly Published on June 18, 2020. doi:https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000003391
Anesthesiology Newly Published on June 18, 2020. doi:https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000003391
Historically, success in the intensive care unit (ICU) has been measured in easily quantifiable metrics such as mortality and length of stay. While these metrics have significant value, they do not take into account what a patient’s life is like after ICU discharge. By understanding that success is not simply measured by leaving the ICU, the recent identification of post–intensive care syndrome has revolutionized the manner in which we think of successful outcomes after critical illness.1  Unfortunately, a significant proportion of patients suffer from post–intensive care syndrome, in which they have long-term cognitive, physical, and emotional issues for extended periods of time—or permanently—after discharge from the ICU. Understanding how to prevent (or at least minimize) post–intensive care syndrome thus represents a new frontier in critical care.