Editorial  |   August 2020
Postoperative Delirium: A Minefield of Markers and Mediators
Author Notes
  • From the Department of Anaesthesia and Pain Medicine, Waikato Clinical School, University of Auckland, Hamilton, New Zealand.
  • This editorial accompanies the article on p. 280.
    This editorial accompanies the article on p. 280.×
  • Accepted for publication April 24, 2020. Published online first on June 17, 2020.
    Accepted for publication April 24, 2020. Published online first on June 17, 2020.×
  • Address correspondence to Dr. Sleigh: Jamie.sleigh@waikatodhb.health.nz
Article Information
Editorial / Central and Peripheral Nervous Systems
Editorial   |   August 2020
Postoperative Delirium: A Minefield of Markers and Mediators
Anesthesiology 8 2020, Vol.133, 255-257. doi:https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000003383
Anesthesiology 8 2020, Vol.133, 255-257. doi:https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000003383
The burst suppression pattern in the electroencephalograpm (EEG) is not seen in healthy physiology. Therefore, it is a seductive idea that the appearance of this pattern is an indicator of brain pathology and that elderly patients showing intraoperative burst suppression may then go on to develop disrupted cognitive function postoperatively. In this issue of the journal, a study by Pedemonte et al.1  replicates the results from a number of previous observational studies, showing that intraoperative burst suppression was associated with a marked increase (from 6 to 25%) in postoperative delirium after cardiac surgery. From table 1 of their article, 15 of the 20 patients who had postoperative delirium had displayed a burst suppression EEG pattern during their surgery.