Newly Published
Correspondence  |   May 2020
Perioperative Neurocognitive Disorder: Reply
Author Notes
  • University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (R.G.E.). roderic.eckenhoff@pennmedicine.upenn.edu
  • Competing Interests: The authors receive funding from an unrelated National Institutes of Health grant (Bethesda, Maryland; grant No. R01GM135633) and declare no competing interests.
    Competing Interests: The authors receive funding from an unrelated National Institutes of Health grant (Bethesda, Maryland; grant No. R01GM135633) and declare no competing interests.×
  • Accepted for publication April 17, 2020.)
    Accepted for publication April 17, 2020.)×
Article Information
Correspondence
Correspondence   |   May 2020
Perioperative Neurocognitive Disorder: Reply
Anesthesiology Newly Published on May 20, 2020. doi:https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000003363
Anesthesiology Newly Published on May 20, 2020. doi:https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000003363
We thank Giordano et al.1  for their interest in our review2  and perioperative neurocognitive disorder in general. The role of mechanical ventilation per se in perioperative neurocognitive disorder, while feasible, is uncertain, as it is difficult to isolate from the many other features of the perioperative period, such as surgery, anesthesia, or extended critical care. In the specific case of our review, there are few if any reports of mechanical ventilation in preclinical models; thus, we regret that we cannot comment further on the role at this time.
The authors receive funding from an unrelated National Institutes of Health grant (Bethesda, Maryland; grant No. R01GM135633) and declare no competing interests.