Newly Published
Correspondence  |   May 2020
Practice Guidelines for Central Venous Access: Comment
Author Notes
  • Tribhuvan University Teaching Hospital, Maharajgunj, Kathmandu, Nepal. gentlesunder@hotmail.com
  • (Accepted for publication April 14, 2020.)
    (Accepted for publication April 14, 2020.)×
Article Information
Correspondence
Correspondence   |   May 2020
Practice Guidelines for Central Venous Access: Comment
Anesthesiology Newly Published on May 12, 2020. doi:https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000003350
Anesthesiology Newly Published on May 12, 2020. doi:https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000003350
We read with great interest the updated report by the American Society of Anesthesiologists Task Force on Central Venous Access about the practice guidelines for central venous access 2020.1 
The relation between internal jugular vein and carotid artery at various head positions may deserve special attention. In a prospective observational study of 1,136 patients, 54% of the patients had internal jugular vein overlying the carotid artery (internal jugular vein overlying more than 75% of the carotid artery in an ultrasound image plane aligned in the direction of cannulating needle).2  The vessel overlap would increase the incidence of accidental carotid puncture, which is the most common complication during cannulation of internal jugular vein (associated with 6.3% to 9.4% of procedures).3