Newly Published
Images in Anesthesiology  |   April 2020
Bloody Cerebrospinal Fluid Drainage
Author Notes
  • From the Department of Anesthesiology, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida.
  • Correspondence: Address correspondence to Dr. Wardhan: richa.wardhan@ufl.edu
Article Information
Images in Anesthesiology / Cardiovascular Anesthesia / Central and Peripheral Nervous Systems / Coagulation and Transfusion / Hematologic System
Images in Anesthesiology   |   April 2020
Bloody Cerebrospinal Fluid Drainage
Anesthesiology Newly Published on April 22, 2020. doi:https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000003334
Anesthesiology Newly Published on April 22, 2020. doi:https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000003334
The present images were obtained 48 h after thoracic endovascular aortic repair. The T2-weighted sagittal magnetic resonance image of the spine demonstrates a ventral subdural and subarachnoid hemorrhage (white arrows) extending from T12–L1 to the termination of the thecal sac at S2 (panel A). The axial image at L1 shows (white arrows) severe ventral compression of the conus medullaris (panel B). Lower extremity paresthesias followed by leg weakness were noted immediately after intended removal of a spinal drain prompting emergent magnetic resonance imaging necessitating surgical evacuation. Notably, 36 h before the first complaint of neurologic symptoms, bloody cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was noticed in the spinal drain. The patient had normal coagulation status throughout the event.