Correspondence  |   June 2020
Effects of Cognitive Aid on Sugammadex Use: Reply
Author Notes
  • Tufts Medical Center, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts (D.M.D.). dandrzymalski@gmail.com
  • (Accepted for publication March 11, 2020. Published online first on April 2, 2020.)
    (Accepted for publication March 11, 2020. Published online first on April 2, 2020.)×
Article Information
Correspondence
Correspondence   |   June 2020
Effects of Cognitive Aid on Sugammadex Use: Reply
Anesthesiology 6 2020, Vol.132, 1615. doi:https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000003306
Anesthesiology 6 2020, Vol.132, 1615. doi:https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000003306
We would like to thank Pereira et al.1  for their interest and comments related to our article.2  In their letter, the authors state that the reduction in sugammadex use could have been the result of better monitoring equipment and/or a reduction in general anesthetics with neuromuscular blockade. While data on use of monitoring equipment was not collected, the number of general anesthetics and administrations of neuromuscular blocking drugs was presented in table 1 of the original article. The statistical analyses in Supplemental Digital Content 2 (http://links.lww.com/ALN/C45), supplemental tables 1 and 2, showed that the slope and level changes were not statistically significant, suggesting that general anesthetics with neuromuscular blockade were relatively unchanged after implementation of the cognitive aid.