Newly Published
Correspondence  |   March 2020
Bacchus Listed for a Liver Transplant: Comment
Author Notes
  • University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California (K.K.). Kate.kronish@ucsf.edu
  • All authors are members of the Liver Intensive Care Group of Europe (LICAGE).
    All authors are members of the Liver Intensive Care Group of Europe (LICAGE).×
  • (Accepted for publication February 7, 2020.)
    (Accepted for publication February 7, 2020.)×
Article Information
Correspondence
Correspondence   |   March 2020
Bacchus Listed for a Liver Transplant: Comment
Anesthesiology Newly Published on March 25, 2020. doi:https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000003230
Anesthesiology Newly Published on March 25, 2020. doi:https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000003230
As the directors of liver transplant anesthesia and transplant surgery, and the medical director of the liver transplant program, we were deeply concerned and disappointed to read “Bacchus Listed for a Liver Transplant” published in Anesthesiology, June 11, 2019.1  The poem envisions an alcoholic cirrhotic patient as Bacchus, the Roman god of wine, drunkenly awaiting his upcoming liver transplant, undeserving of the gift he is about to receive. This piece does a disservice to all patients with end-stage liver disease, regardless of etiology, and harms the entire transplant community—patients, donor families, and their medical teams. Patients require liver transplantation for a variety of reasons, not just alcoholic cirrhosis. To suggest otherwise is to stigmatize all transplant recipients and potential recipients. Furthermore, to depict patients with alcoholic liver disease like Bacchus, frivolously drinking and unperturbed by the consequences, is patient shaming.