Newly Published
Correspondence  |   March 2020
Bacchus Listed for a Liver Transplant: Comment
Author Notes
  • Medical Center University Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany (F.H.S.). fuat.saner@uni-due.de
  • All authors are members of the Liver Intensive Care Group of Europe (LICAGE).
    All authors are members of the Liver Intensive Care Group of Europe (LICAGE).×
  • (Accepted for publication February 7, 2020.)
    (Accepted for publication February 7, 2020.)×
Article Information
Correspondence
Correspondence   |   March 2020
Bacchus Listed for a Liver Transplant: Comment
Anesthesiology Newly Published on March 25, 2020. doi:https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000003229
Anesthesiology Newly Published on March 25, 2020. doi:https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000003229
As physicians and members of the Council of the Liver Intensive Care Group of Europe (LICAGE), we read with great concern the poem by Dr. Hester recently published in Anesthesiology.1 
It is our strong opinion that such a contribution has nothing to do with “Creative writing that explores the abstract side of our profession and our lives.”
We think that Dr. Hester’s paper ignores not only the suffering of our patients or the transplant community’s efforts to offer them a reliable and long-lasting treatment, but also the current evidence and practice. In fact, liver transplantation is the only cure for end-stage alcoholic liver disease, which remains a common indication for this procedure worldwide.2–7  Transplant centers commonly require at least 6 months of alcohol abstinence before patients can be listed for liver transplantation. In fact, the 1993 Consensus Conference of Paris recognized an abstinence of 3 to 6 months as a good predictor of alcohol relapse avoidance.2  This period not only gives physicians a possibility to review if the patient’s liver resumes function on its own in the absence of alcohol, but also is an opportunity for the patient to demonstrate how strong their intention is to stay sober after the surgery.