Newly Published
Correspondence  |   March 2020
Anesthesiologist Burnout, Distress, and Depression: Reply
Author Notes
  • The American Board of Anesthesiology, Raleigh, North Carolina (H.S.). Huaping.Sun@theABA.org
  • (Accepted for publication February 21, 2020.)
    (Accepted for publication February 21, 2020.)×
Article Information
Correspondence
Correspondence   |   March 2020
Anesthesiologist Burnout, Distress, and Depression: Reply
Anesthesiology Newly Published on March 17, 2020. doi:https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000003262
Anesthesiology Newly Published on March 17, 2020. doi:https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000003262
We thank Drs. Ong, Lim, and Ong1  for their interest in our publication2  and appreciate the opportunity to discuss burnout, an issue that is relevant well beyond anesthesiology residents. Questions are raised about the poor characterization of burnout, inaccuracy of burnout assessment tools, and the lack of diagnostic criteria to identify burnout. We agree that burnout is a complex issue and that estimates of its prevalence should be interpreted in appropriate consideration of the context.
As stated by Ong et al.,1  burnout is classified as an “occupational phenomenon” by the World Health Organization (Geneva, Switzerland). The manifestation of burnout, as a psychologic syndrome, may depend on personal characteristics, working environment, and even social, political, and economic factors.3  Both theoretical models and empirical evidence have guided the characterization of burnout, and qualitative work from social, clinical, and industrial-organizational psychologists has identified different dimensions of burnout, including exhaustion, cynicism, and inefficacy.3,4  These dimensions are reasonably captured by how the International Classification of Diseases, 11th edition, characterizes burnout.