Newly Published
Editorial  |   March 2020
Understanding the Mysteries of Mechanical Power
Author Notes
  • From the Laboratory of Pulmonary Investigation, Carlos Chagas Filho Institute of Biophysics, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil (P.L.S., P.R.M.R.); the Department of Surgical Sciences and Integrated Diagnostics, University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy (P.P.); and the San Martino Policlinico Hospital, Scientific Institute for Research, Hospitalization and Healthcare for Oncology and Neurosciences, Genoa, Italy (P.P).
  • Accepted for publication January 22, 2020.
    Accepted for publication January 22, 2020.×
  • Correspondence: Address correspondence to Dr. Rocco: prmrocco@gmail.ufrj.br
Article Information
Editorial / Critical Care / Respiratory System
Editorial   |   March 2020
Understanding the Mysteries of Mechanical Power
Anesthesiology Newly Published on March 2, 2020. doi:https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000003222
Anesthesiology Newly Published on March 2, 2020. doi:https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000003222
In the current issue, Vassali et al. compared the individual effects of high tidal volume (VT), respiratory rate (RR), and positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP), each delivered at two levels of mechanical power (15 and 30 J/min), on lung mechanics, hemodynamics, gas exchange, and pulmonary morphology in healthy piglets under prone positioning.1  The study showed that different ventilatory strategies delivered at iso-mechanical power led to similar lung injury. After their theoretical study in which the contribution of different components of power was evaluated,2  the authors also provided preclinical data on the contribution of VT, RR, and PEEP to lung damage.