Newly Published
Correspondence  |   February 2020
Current Difficult Airway Management: Not Good Enough!: Comment
Author Notes
  • NorthShore University HealthSystem, Evanston, Illinois (J.H.M.). JMarymont@northshore.org
  • Accepted for publication January 28, 2020.
    Accepted for publication January 28, 2020.×
Article Information
Correspondence
Correspondence   |   February 2020
Current Difficult Airway Management: Not Good Enough!: Comment
Anesthesiology Newly Published on February 25, 2020. doi:https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000003208
Anesthesiology Newly Published on February 25, 2020. doi:https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000003208
The Editorial authored by Asai and Hillman1  contains the statement “If difficult airway management is predicted, general anesthesia should not be induced before securing the airway.” We believe their statement may be inconsistent with the American Society of Anesthesiologists (Schaumburg, Illinois; ASA) Practice Guidelines for Management of the Difficult Airway.2  The ASA Practice Guidelines defines a difficult airway as “the clinical situation in which a conventionally trained anesthesiologist experiences difficulty with facemask ventilation of the upper airway, difficulty with tracheal intubation, or both.” In addition, Asai and Hillman do not define their use of the word “predicted.”
Contained within the ASA Practice Guidelines is a difficult airway algorithm, which recommends that the anesthesiologist consider the relative merits and feasibility of basic management choices: