Education  |   July 2020
Patient Blood Management: Effectiveness and Future Potential
Author Notes
  • From the Institute of Anesthesiology, University of Zurich and University Hospital Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland (D.R.S.); the Department of Surgical Specialties, Biochemistry and Immunology, School of Medicine, University of Málaga, Málaga, Spain (M.M.); the Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Royal Papworth Hospital, Cambridge, United Kingdom (A.A.K.); the Departments of Anesthesiology and Critical Care, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (J.H.L.); and the Department of Anesthesiology, Intensive Care Medicine and Pain Therapy University Hospital Frankfurt, Germany (K.Z.).
  • This article is featured in “This Month in Anesthesiology,” page 1A.
    This article is featured in “This Month in Anesthesiology,” page 1A.×
  • Submitted for publication August 30, 2019. Accepted for publication January 22, 2020. Published online first on February 25, 2020.
    Submitted for publication August 30, 2019. Accepted for publication January 22, 2020. Published online first on February 25, 2020.×
  • Address correspondence to Dr. Spahn: Institute of Anesthesiology, University Hospital Zurich, Rämistrasse 100, 8091 Zurich, Switzerland. donat.spahn@usz.ch. Information on purchasing reprints may be found at www.anesthesiology.org or on the masthead page at the beginning of this issue. Anesthesiology’s articles are made freely accessible to all readers, for personal use only, 6 months from the cover date of the issue.
Article Information
Education / Cardiovascular Anesthesia / Coagulation and Transfusion / Endocrine and Metabolic Systems / Hematologic System / Clinical Focus Review
Education   |   July 2020
Patient Blood Management: Effectiveness and Future Potential
Anesthesiology 7 2020, Vol.133, 212-222. doi:https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000003198
Anesthesiology 7 2020, Vol.133, 212-222. doi:https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000003198
Before major surgery, 30 to 40% of patients are anemic, an important consideration that is associated with increased erythrocyte transfusions, prolonged hospital length of stay, more frequent intensive care admissions, infections, and thromboembolic events, and mortality.1–4  Surgical bleeding contributes to anemia, increases transfusions, and independently increases mortality.5  In addition, transfusion of allogeneic blood products is associated with increased morbidity and mortality6  and increased costs, and allogeneic blood products are a limited resource.6–8  Therefore, as a pragmatic solution, the concept of Patient Blood Management was developed and published in its preliminary form, first in the anesthesia literature as an editorial in Anesthesiology in 2008.9  The authors hypothesized that “Patient Blood Management will decrease the use of allogeneic erythrocyte transfusion and its cost and adverse sequelae significantly.” Currently, 12 yr later, we can conclude this is indeed the case.10–12