Newly Published
Correspondence  |   February 2020
Anesthesia and Cancer Recurrence: Comment
Author Notes
  • Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. jintae73@gmail.com
  • This letter was sent to the author of the original article referenced above, who declined to respond.—Evan D. Kharasch, M.D., Ph.D., Editor-in-Chief.
    This letter was sent to the author of the original article referenced above, who declined to respond.—Evan D. Kharasch, M.D., Ph.D., Editor-in-Chief.×
  • Accepted for publication January 21, 2020.
    Accepted for publication January 21, 2020.×
Article Information
Correspondence
Correspondence   |   February 2020
Anesthesia and Cancer Recurrence: Comment
Anesthesiology Newly Published on February 11, 2020. doi:https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000003196
Anesthesiology Newly Published on February 11, 2020. doi:https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000003196
The effect of anesthetic technique on cancer outcomes is of particular interest. Based on the concept that invasiveness of surgery and inflammation may affect cancer recurrence, a recent editorial1  commented that our recent study2  did not explore surgical extent (i.e., breast-conserving surgery vs. total mastectomy). Thus, we performed a subgroup analysis to evaluate the influence of type of anesthesia on cancer recurrence only in patients receiving total mastectomy. In the propensity-matched cohort, the Cox regression analysis revealed that there was no difference in recurrence-free survival between patients receiving intravenous anesthesia and those receiving inhalation anesthesia (table 1). The Kaplan–Meier survival curves also demonstrated no significant differences in long-term outcome between the two groups (fig. 1). Therefore, surgical procedure did not influence the outcomes of total intravenous versus inhalation anesthesia for breast cancer surgery.