Newly Published
Clinical Focus Review  |   January 2020
Ventilatory Mechanics in the Patient with Obesity
Author Notes
  • From the Department of Anesthesia, Critical Care, and Pain Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.
  • Submitted for publication August 6, 2019. Accepted for publication December 20, 2019.
    Submitted for publication August 6, 2019. Accepted for publication December 20, 2019.×
  • Correspondence: Address correspondence to Dr. Berra: Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02141. lberra@mgh.harvard.edu. Information on purchasing reprints may be found at www.anesthesiology.org or on the masthead page at the beginning of this issue. Anesthesiology’s articles are made freely accessible to all readers, for personal use only, 6 months from the cover date of the issue.
Article Information
Airway Management / Endocrine and Metabolic Systems / Respiratory System / Clinical Focus Review
Clinical Focus Review   |   January 2020
Ventilatory Mechanics in the Patient with Obesity
Anesthesiology Newly Published on January 29, 2020. doi:https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000003154
Anesthesiology Newly Published on January 29, 2020. doi:https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000003154
Obesity is a pathologic increase in the body adipose tissue that is associated with an augmented incidence of chronic health-threatening conditions, such as diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and cancer.1  In 2015, 12% of the world adult population and 5% of the world pediatric population were obese, with the highest prevalence among women aged 60 to 64 yr living in high-income countries.2  Since 1980, the incidence of obesity has globally increased across all age classes and sociodemographic levels.2  The higher rates of this increase were observed among children. In the United States, one of the countries most affected by the “obesity pandemic,” the prevalence is approaching 40% among adults, 20% among adolescents, and 14% among children, and it is higher in women, Hispanic whites, and black Americans.3