Newly Published
Clinical Focus Review  |   January 2020
Anesthetic Implications of Button Battery Ingestion in Children
Author Notes
  • From the Division of Pediatric Anesthesia, Department of Anesthesiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina.
  • Submitted for publication September 2, 2019. Accepted for publication December 10, 2019.
    Submitted for publication September 2, 2019. Accepted for publication December 10, 2019.×
  • Correspondence: Address correspondence to Dr. Eck: P.O. Box 3094, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710. john.eck@duke.edu. Information on purchasing reprints may be found at www.anesthesiology.org or on the masthead page at the beginning of this issue. Anesthesiology’s articles are made freely accessible to all readers, for personal use only, 6 months from the cover date of the issue.
Article Information
Gastrointestinal and Hepatic Systems / Pediatric Anesthesia / Clinical Focus Review
Clinical Focus Review   |   January 2020
Anesthetic Implications of Button Battery Ingestion in Children
Anesthesiology Newly Published on January 29, 2020. doi:https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000003121
Anesthesiology Newly Published on January 29, 2020. doi:https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000003121
Foreign body ingestion is common in young children (those less than 5 yr of age).1,2  Most ingested items pass uneventfully through the gastrointestinal tract, but certain items may prove dangerous due to their size, composition, or location.3,4  The following Clinical Focus Review discusses the increasingly common problem of button battery ingestion, which, when left untreated can rapidly result in life-threatening complications, particularly in young children. The definitive management requires prompt recognition and endoscopic removal of batteries, often necessitating the use of general anesthesia. Awareness of the potential problems and recommended solutions for button battery ingestion is therefore of vital importance to practicing anesthesiologists.