Education  |   April 2020
Perioperative Point-of-Care Ultrasound: From Concept to Application
Author Notes
  • From the Department of Anesthesiology, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California (D.R.); Duke University Hospital, Durham, North Carolina (Y.S.B); Department of Anesthesiology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (Y.S.B); Department of Anesthesiology, Critical Care and Pain Management, Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, New York (S.H.); Weill-Cornell Medical College, New York, New York (S.H.); and Department of Anesthesiology, University of Utah Health, Salt Lake City, Utah (J.Z.).
  • This article is featured in “This Month in Anesthesiology,” page 1A.
    This article is featured in “This Month in Anesthesiology,” page 1A.×
  • Submitted for publication June 24, 2019. Accepted for publication November 27, 2019. Published online first on January 16, 2020.
    Submitted for publication June 24, 2019. Accepted for publication November 27, 2019. Published online first on January 16, 2020.×
  • Address correspondence to Dr. Ramsingh: Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Care, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California 92354. dramsingh@llu.edu. Information on purchasing reprints may be found at www.anesthesiology.org or on the masthead page at the beginning of this issue. Anesthesiology’s articles are made freely accessible to all readers, for personal use only, 6 months from the cover date of the issue.
Article Information
Education / Airway Management / Radiological and Other Imaging / Clinical Focus Review
Education   |   April 2020
Perioperative Point-of-Care Ultrasound: From Concept to Application
Anesthesiology 4 2020, Vol.132, 908-916. doi:https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000003113
Anesthesiology 4 2020, Vol.132, 908-916. doi:https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000003113
Perhaps the most essential aspect of a physician’s role is our diagnostic capabilities. If we cannot accurately diagnose pathology, we cannot effectively treat and may cause patient harm. Point-of-care ultrasound has emerged as a modality to improve bedside assessment. Point-of-care ultrasound refers to the use of ultrasonography at the patient’s bedside for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes.1  The physician acquires and interprets all images in real time and then uses that information to diagnose and direct therapies. While comprehensive imaging can be performed and interpreted at the point-of-care, the term point-of-care ultrasound typically refers to an ultrasound exam that is simple, rapid, and goal-oriented. It is a tool used most often to provide answers to acute “yes or no” clinical questions but can be more sophisticated based on the provider’s qualifications. In the acute care setting, this modality has demonstrated utility for nearly every component of bedside assessment, including cardiovascular, pulmonary, airway, and abdominal evaluation.2–5