Newly Published
Editorial  |   January 2020
Automated Continuous Noninvasive Ward Monitoring: Validation of Measurement Systems Is the Real Challenge
Author Notes
  • From the Department of Anesthesiology, Center of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany (B.S., P.H.); the Outcomes Research Consortium, Cleveland, Ohio (B.S., A.K.K.); the Department of Anesthesiology, Section on Critical Care Medicine, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Wake Forest Baptist Health, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (A.K.K.); the Wake Forest Center for Biomedical Informatics, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (A.K.K.); and the Critical Illness, Injury and Recovery Research Center, Wake Forest University School of Medicine Winston-Salem, North Carolina (A.K.K.).
  • Accepted for publication November 4, 2019.
    Accepted for publication November 4, 2019.×
  • This editorial accompanies the article on p. XXX.
    This editorial accompanies the article on p. XXX.×
  • Correspondence: Address correspondence to Dr. Saugel: bernd.saugel@gmx.de
Article Information
Editorial / Cardiovascular Anesthesia / Critical Care / Technology / Equipment / Monitoring / Quality Improvement
Editorial   |   January 2020
Automated Continuous Noninvasive Ward Monitoring: Validation of Measurement Systems Is the Real Challenge
Anesthesiology Newly Published on January 8, 2020. doi:https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000003100
Anesthesiology Newly Published on January 8, 2020. doi:https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000003100
About half of all adverse events in hospitalized patients occur on the general care ward.1  However, acute cardiorespiratory events do not occur out of the blue. Up to 60% of patients have at least one or more abnormal vital signs as early as 4 to 6 h before a cardiac arrest.2  Early detection of changes in cardiorespiratory physiology therefore is critical for preventative or therapeutic measures to be effective and to eventually improve patient outcomes. Automated continuous noninvasive ward monitoring may be a promising approach for improving surveillance of general care ward patients at risk for cardiorespiratory events. With numerous continuous ward monitoring devices flooding the healthcare market, it becomes crucial to rigorously test their measurement performance and validate them in different clinical settings before proceeding to larger clinical trials (fig. 1).