Newly Published
Images in Anesthesiology  |   December 2019
Temporary Prosthetic Valvular Insufficiency with the Inspiris Aortic Valve
Author Notes
  • From the Departments of Cardiothoracic Anesthesia (D.M., A.A.) and Cardiothoracic Surgery (R.C., P.W.), Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio.
  • Correspondence: Address correspondence to Dr. Marciniak: marcind@ccf.org
Article Information
Images in Anesthesiology / Cardiovascular Anesthesia
Images in Anesthesiology   |   December 2019
Temporary Prosthetic Valvular Insufficiency with the Inspiris Aortic Valve
Anesthesiology Newly Published on December 30, 2019. doi:https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000003094
Anesthesiology Newly Published on December 30, 2019. doi:https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000003094
The Edwards Inspiris Resilia valve is a new bioprosthetic aortic valve designed to accept future valve-in valve replacement via transcatheter aortic valve replacement. It is our repeated experience that this valve develops a significant but transient intravalvular leak immediately after separation from cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) that mimics a paravalvular leak. Panel A of this image is a mid-esophageal long-axis view demonstrating a highly eccentric, posteriorly directed jet between the non- and right coronary cusps (white arrow; LA indicates left atrium and LV is left ventricle). Panel B is a mid-esophageal aortic valve short-axis view with an additional jet between the right and left coronary cusps (red arrow). Resolution occurs spontaneously in the minutes after separation from CPB.