Editorial  |   February 2020
Robots Will Perform Anesthesia in the Near Future
Author Notes
  • From the Department of Anesthesiology, McGill University, Montreal, Canada.
  • This editorial accompanies the article on p. 253.
    This editorial accompanies the article on p. 253.×
  • Accepted for publication October 21, 2019. Published online first on December 12, 2019.
    Accepted for publication October 21, 2019. Published online first on December 12, 2019.×
  • Address correspondence to Dr. Hemmerling: thomas.hemmerling@mcgill.ca
Article Information
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Editorial   |   February 2020
Robots Will Perform Anesthesia in the Near Future
Anesthesiology 2 2020, Vol.132, 219-220. doi:https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000003088
Anesthesiology 2 2020, Vol.132, 219-220. doi:https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000003088
In this month’s edition, Joosten et al.1  evaluated the performance of multiple closed loop systems for administration of anesthesia in 90 patients undergoing major noncardiac surgery in a single center. Anesthesia (hypnosis and analgesia), fluid administration, and ventilation were controlled by separate and independently working closed loop systems; the automated system outperformed manual control and had a significant, albeit minimal, beneficial impact on neurocognitive recovery after surgery.
In general, closed loop anesthesia control outperforms manual control2 : anesthesia, sedation, fluid management, or ventilation all benefit from the use of automated systems. More recently, several of these closed loop systems have been investigated at the same time, with the study by Joosten et al.1  being the first determining the superior performance of closed loop systems for all three components mentioned before.