Newly Published
Editorial  |   January 2020
Global Safe Pediatric Anesthesia Care
Author Notes
  • From the Children’s Hospital at Westmead, Sydney, Australia; Department of Anaesthesiology, University of Papua New Guinea; and Paediatric Anaesthesia Committee, World Federation of Societies of Anaesthesiologists.
  • Accepted for publication September 9, 2019.
    Accepted for publication September 9, 2019.×
  • Correspondence: Address correspondence to Dr. Cooper: mgcoops59@gmail.com
Article Information
Editorial / Pediatric Anesthesia
Editorial   |   January 2020
Global Safe Pediatric Anesthesia Care
Anesthesiology Newly Published on January 8, 2020. doi:https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000003028
Anesthesiology Newly Published on January 8, 2020. doi:https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000003028
It is now recognized that five billion of more than seven billion people globally do not have timely access to safe surgery and anesthesia. This is a surgical and anesthesia access, workforce, and funding crisis. If you consider that in many low- and middle-income countries, children under the age of 15 yr make up 40% to 50% of the population, then two thirds of the world’s children (1.7 billion) lack access to appropriate surgical and anesthesia care. Only 8% of children in these countries have timely access to surgical care, and injuries alone kill more children globally than human immunodeficiency virus, tuberculosis, and malaria combined.1  This deficit represents the majority of the global pediatric surgical burden. Children are often the most marginalized group in already marginalized societies. A child’s needs may be neglected and the child with an untreated surgical condition may be ostracized, never attend school, or even be abandoned.