Newly Published
Images in Anesthesiology  |   November 2019
Button Battery Ingestion: A True Surgical and Anesthetic Emergency
Author Notes
  • From the Department of Anesthesiology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina.
  • Correspondence: Address correspondence to Dr. Templeton: ttemplet@wakehealth.edu
Article Information
Images in Anesthesiology / Gastrointestinal and Hepatic Systems / Respiratory System
Images in Anesthesiology   |   November 2019
Button Battery Ingestion: A True Surgical and Anesthetic Emergency
Anesthesiology Newly Published on November 21, 2019. doi:https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000003019
Anesthesiology Newly Published on November 21, 2019. doi:https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000003019
Button battery ingestion is a surgical emergency frequently associated with significant morbidity and mortality. In the United States, approximately 3,500 button battery ingestions are reported annually.1  Classically, button batteries have a “double halo” sign on chest x-ray, which distinguishes them from coins (see image; R indicates right side).2  The mechanism of injury is liquefactive necrosis from electrochemical generation of hydroxide ions and the resultant alkaline environment at the negative pole of the battery. Given that even short periods of exposure can lead to significant injury, clinicians should disregard nil per os guidelines and proceed with anesthesia and endoscopic removal.1