Newly Published
SPECIAL ARTICLE  |   September 2019
Perioperative Neurocognitive Disorder: State of the Preclinical Science
Author Notes
  • From Anesthesiology and Critical Care, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (R.G.E., H.W., M.F.E.); Department of Anesthesia and Perioperative Care, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California (M.M.); Department of Anesthesia, Critical Care and Pain Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (Z.X.); Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (D.J.C.); Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (Z.X., D.J.C.); Department of Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University and Veterans Administration Portland Health Care System, Portland, Oregon (S.J.G.); Department of Anesthesiology, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, Virginia (Z.Z.); Department of Anesthesiology, Columbia University Irving Medical Center, New York, New York (R.A.W.); Department of Anesthesiology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (N.T.); and Department of Anesthesia, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada (B.A.O.).
  • Submitted for publication March 28, 2019. Accepted for publication July 25, 2019.
    Submitted for publication March 28, 2019. Accepted for publication July 25, 2019.×
  • Correspondence: Address correspondence to Dr. R. G. Eckenhoff: Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, 3620 Hamilton Walk, 311 John Morgan Building, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104. reckenho@pennmedicine.upenn.edu.Information on purchasing reprints may be found at www.anesthesiology.org or on the masthead page at the beginning of this issue. Anesthesiology’s articles are made freely accessible to all readers, for personal use only, 6 months from the cover date of the issue.
Article Information
Central and Peripheral Nervous Systems / Geriatric Anesthesia
SPECIAL ARTICLE   |   September 2019
Perioperative Neurocognitive Disorder: State of the Preclinical Science
Anesthesiology Newly Published on September 12, 2019. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002956
Anesthesiology Newly Published on September 12, 2019. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002956
Abstract

The purpose of this article is to provide a succinct summary of the different experimental approaches that have been used in preclinical postoperative cognitive dysfunction research, and an overview of the knowledge that has accrued. This is not intended to be a comprehensive review, but rather is intended to highlight how the many different approaches have contributed to our understanding of postoperative cognitive dysfunction, and to identify knowledge gaps to be filled by further research. The authors have organized this report by the level of experimental and systems complexity, starting with molecular and cellular approaches, then moving to intact invertebrates and vertebrate animal models. In addition, the authors’ goal is to improve the quality and consistency of postoperative cognitive dysfunction and perioperative neurocognitive disorder research by promoting optimal study design, enhanced transparency, and “best practices” in experimental design and reporting to increase the likelihood of corroborating results. Thus, the authors conclude with general guidelines for designing, conducting and reporting perioperative neurocognitive disorder rodent research.