Correspondence  |   November 2019
Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation 1-yr Outcome: Comment
Author Notes
  • Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon. phillith@ohsu.edu
  • (Accepted for publication August 12, 2019.)
    (Accepted for publication August 12, 2019.)×
Article Information
Correspondence
Correspondence   |   November 2019
Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation 1-yr Outcome: Comment
Anesthesiology 11 2019, Vol.131, 1195-1196. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002971
Anesthesiology 11 2019, Vol.131, 1195-1196. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002971
Current trials published in medical literature, and especially the critical care literature, measure similar primary endpoints, namely, mortality. This measure is often an appropriate way of examining the effectiveness of some of our most novel and innovative treatments. Many trials also measure a number of other secondary endpoints, including time free from a ventilator or time spent in the hospital. But often these trials do not describe a patient’s neurologic status or functional status after these interventions. Treatments for medical conditions once thought nonsurvivable have advanced rapidly in recent years. Patients can be kept alive in the face of complete failure of multiple organs, often for extended periods of time. While mortality is an important endpoint, we applaud the recent publication by Grasselli et al.1  for examining endpoints specifically related to a patient’s quality of life.