Newly Published
Correspondence  |   August 2019
Opioid-induced Ventilatory Depression in Sleep Apnea: Comment
Author Notes
  • Trident Medical Center, Charleston, South Carolina (F.J.O.). foverdyk@gmail.com
  • (Accepted for publication May 20, 2019.)
    (Accepted for publication May 20, 2019.)×
Article Information
Correspondence
Correspondence   |   August 2019
Opioid-induced Ventilatory Depression in Sleep Apnea: Comment
Anesthesiology Newly Published on August 7, 2019. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002929
Anesthesiology Newly Published on August 7, 2019. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002929
On the front page of the February 2019 issue of Anesthesiology, the article by Doufas et al. was encapsulated as, “Adults with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Do Not Have Increased Sensitivity to Opioid-induced Ventilatory Depression.”1   This is potentially misleading.
The complexity of the study design, pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modeling, and the assumptions and limitations of the study may be beyond the understanding of the average reader. In their accompanying editorial, Henthorn and Olofsen did an admirable job explaining the many limitations.2  They stated, “...we should be very cautious drawing conclusions in the language of pharmacokinetics–pharmacodynamics when there are no drug concentrations (pharmacokinetics) data and when there is non–steady-state effect data and either the onset effect or offset effect is missing.”