Newly Published
Review Article  |   July 2019
Learners and Luddites in the Twenty-first Century: Bringing Evidence-based Education to Anesthesiology
Author Notes
  • From the Department of Anesthesiology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (S.M.M., R.S.I., F.C.); the Department of Anesthesiology, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Lexington, Kentucky (R.M.S.); Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Department of Anesthesia, Critical Care and Pain Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, (J.D.M.); and Department of Anesthesiology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee (M.D.M.).
  • Submitted for publication September 4, 2018. Accepted for publication May 6, 2019.
    Submitted for publication September 4, 2018. Accepted for publication May 6, 2019.×
  • Correspondence: Address correspondence to Dr. Martinelli: N2198 UNC Hospitals #7010, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599. smartinelli@aims.unc.edu. Information on purchasing reprints may be found at www.anesthesiology.org or on the masthead page at the beginning of this issue. Anesthesiology’s articles are made freely accessible to all readers, for personal use only, 6 months from the cover date of the issue.
Article Information
Review Article / Education / CPD / Ethics / Medicolegal Issues
Review Article   |   July 2019
Learners and Luddites in the Twenty-first Century: Bringing Evidence-based Education to Anesthesiology
Anesthesiology Newly Published on July 29, 2019. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002827
Anesthesiology Newly Published on July 29, 2019. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002827
Abstract

Anesthesiologists are both teachers and learners and alternate between these roles throughout their careers. However, few anesthesiologists have formal training in the methodologies and theories of education. Many anesthesiology educators often teach as they were taught and may not be taking advantage of current evidence in education to guide and optimize the way they teach and learn. This review describes the most up-to-date evidence in education for teaching knowledge, procedural skills, and professionalism. Methods such as active learning, spaced learning, interleaving, retrieval practice, e-learning, experiential learning, and the use of cognitive aids will be described. We made an effort to illustrate the best available evidence supporting educational practices while recognizing the inherent challenges in medical education research. Similar to implementing evidence in clinical practice in an attempt to improve patient outcomes, implementing an evidence-based approach to anesthesiology education may improve learning outcomes.