Newly Published
SPECIAL ARTICLE  |   July 2019
Musings from an Unlikely Clinician–Scientist: 2018 American Society of Anesthesiologists Excellence in Research Award
Author Notes
  • From the Department of Anesthesia and the Department of Physiology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada; and the Department of Anesthesia, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Canada.
  • Submitted for publication April 18, 2019. Accepted for publication May 13, 2019.
    Submitted for publication April 18, 2019. Accepted for publication May 13, 2019.×
  • Correspondence: Address correspondence to Dr. Orser: Chair, Department of Anesthesia, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, M5S 1A8. beverley.orser@utoronto.ca. Information on purchasing reprints may be found at www.anesthesiology.org or on the masthead page at the beginning of this issue. Anesthesiology’s articles are made freely accessible to all readers, for personal use only, 6 months from the cover date of the issue.
Article Information
Central and Peripheral Nervous Systems / Pharmacology
SPECIAL ARTICLE   |   July 2019
Musings from an Unlikely Clinician–Scientist: 2018 American Society of Anesthesiologists Excellence in Research Award
Anesthesiology Newly Published on July 15, 2019. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002881
Anesthesiology Newly Published on July 15, 2019. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002881
Abstract

This article, which stems from the 2018 American Society of Anesthesiologists Excellence in Research Award Lecture, aims to encourage young investigators, offer advice, and share several early life experiences that have influenced the author’s career as an anesthesiologist and clinician–scientist. The article also describes key discoveries that have increased understanding of the role of γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptors in health and disease. The author’s research team identified the unique pharmacologic properties of extrasynaptic GABAA receptors and their role in the anesthetic state. The author’s team also showed that extrasynaptic GABAA receptors expressed in neuronal and nonneuronal cells contribute to a variety of disorders and are novel drug targets. The author’s overarching message is that young investigators must create their own unique narratives, train hard, be relentless in their studies and—most important—enjoy the journey of discovering new truths that will ultimately benefit patients.