Newly Published
Editorial Views  |   May 2019
If You Thought That Night Float Solved Everything, Keep Dreaming
Author Notes
  • From the Department of Anesthesia, Critical Care and Pain Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.
  • Accepted for publication April 3, 2019.
    Accepted for publication April 3, 2019.×
  • Correspondence: Address correspondence to Dr. Baker: khbaker@partners.org
Article Information
Editorial Views / Sleep Medicine
Editorial Views   |   May 2019
If You Thought That Night Float Solved Everything, Keep Dreaming
Anesthesiology Newly Published on May 28, 2019. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002790
Anesthesiology Newly Published on May 28, 2019. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002790
In 2003, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education began limiting duty hours. The rationale for this change was that fewer hours would decrease fatigue and, in turn, increase patient safety. In response, many programs began using night float systems to meet these requirements while continuing to cover nighttime clinical needs. Perhaps in anticipation of this growth in the use of night float, in 2011 the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education limited the number of consecutive nights of night float to 6. This limit on the number of consecutive night float shifts was later removed by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education in 2017.