Editorial Views  |   May 2019
Babies and Children at Last: Pediatric Cardiac Output Monitoring in the Twenty-first Century
Author Notes
  • From the Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles Medical Center, Los Angeles, California.
  • This editorial accompanies the article on p. 712 and has a related Infographic on p. 19A.
    This editorial accompanies the article on p. 712 and has a related Infographic on p. 19A.×
  • Accepted for publication February 6, 2019.
    Accepted for publication February 6, 2019.×
  • Address correspondence to Dr. Cannesson: mcannesson@mednet.ucla.edu
Article Information
Editorial Views / Cardiovascular Anesthesia / Pediatric Anesthesia
Editorial Views   |   May 2019
Babies and Children at Last: Pediatric Cardiac Output Monitoring in the Twenty-first Century
Anesthesiology 5 2019, Vol.130, 671-673. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002673
Anesthesiology 5 2019, Vol.130, 671-673. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002673
In this issue of Anesthesiology, Sigurdsson et al. report on a new cardiac output monitoring system based on extracorporeal arteriovenous ultrasound measurement in small children.1  While the technology they are describing is invasive, it is one of the first technologies to be meticulously tested in this important patient population. Specifically, the authors used the aortic flow probe—the physiologic gold standard for cardiac output monitoring—as a reference and they included children presenting with various congenital heart diseases. Rarely have clinical hemodynamic monitoring studies achieved such a level of scientific rigor not only in the pediatric setting, but also in the adult setting.