Reviews of Educational Material  |   March 2019
Enhanced Recovery for Major Abdominopelvic Surgery
Author Notes
  • Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (E.K.G.). emily.gordon@uphs.upenn.edu
  • (Accepted for publication November 28, 2018.)
    (Accepted for publication November 28, 2018.)×
Article Information
Reviews of Educational Material / Cardiovascular Anesthesia / Pain Medicine / Regional Anesthesia / Renal and Urinary Systems / Electrolyte Balance / Quality Improvement / Opioid
Reviews of Educational Material   |   March 2019
Enhanced Recovery for Major Abdominopelvic Surgery
Anesthesiology 3 2019, Vol.130, 522. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002595
Anesthesiology 3 2019, Vol.130, 522. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002595
Over the last decade, enhanced recovery protocols have become common practice across the country at countless institutions. These protocols entail a multimodal approach to reduce the effects of surgical stress and improve outcomes.1  From a surgical standpoint, this includes the use of minimally invasive techniques and improved patient education before surgery. As anesthesiologists, this has affected the way that we must think about non per os status, fluid therapy, and perioperative pain management.
This book is a concise review and breakdown of the evidence driving the enhanced recovery protocols implemented by many institutions across several surgical subspecialties. It is broken down into a total of five sections. The first three sections of the book address the application of enhanced recovery protocols in the preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative periods. The final two sections explore implementation challenges and examples of protocols that are currently being used at various institutions.