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Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum  |   February 2019
Headlining the Musical Backdrop to Pauline Siegel’s Caesarean Section “Under Local Anesthesia”
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Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum
Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum   |   February 2019
Headlining the Musical Backdrop to Pauline Siegel’s Caesarean Section “Under Local Anesthesia”
Anesthesiology 2 2019, Vol.130, 308. doi:https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000002613
Anesthesiology 2 2019, Vol.130, 308. doi:https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000002613
Allen and Pauline Siegel of Chicago, Illinois, seem elated in 1941 following the successful Caesarean-section delivery of their son by obstetrician Edward L. Cornell, as performed “under local anesthesia.” During the procedure, the 29-yr-old mother listened to soothing frequency-modulated (FM) radio music. Her obstetrician insisted on keeping the “pain-calmer” music “from distracting the operating staff.” Seventy-seven years ago, this story made newspaper headlines nationwide. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
Allen and Pauline Siegel of Chicago, Illinois, seem elated in 1941 following the successful Caesarean-section delivery of their son by obstetrician Edward L. Cornell, as performed “under local anesthesia.” During the procedure, the 29-yr-old mother listened to soothing frequency-modulated (FM) radio music. Her obstetrician insisted on keeping the “pain-calmer” music “from distracting the operating staff.” Seventy-seven years ago, this story made newspaper headlines nationwide. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
Allen and Pauline Siegel of Chicago, Illinois, seem elated in 1941 following the successful Caesarean-section delivery of their son by obstetrician Edward L. Cornell, as performed “under local anesthesia.” During the procedure, the 29-yr-old mother listened to soothing frequency-modulated (FM) radio music. Her obstetrician insisted on keeping the “pain-calmer” music “from distracting the operating staff.” Seventy-seven years ago, this story made newspaper headlines nationwide. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
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George S. Bause, M.D., M.P.H., Honorary Curator and Laureate of the History of Anesthesia, Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology, Schaumburg, Illinois, and Clinical Associate Professor, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. UJYC@aol.com.
Allen and Pauline Siegel of Chicago, Illinois, seem elated in 1941 following the successful Caesarean-section delivery of their son by obstetrician Edward L. Cornell, as performed “under local anesthesia.” During the procedure, the 29-yr-old mother listened to soothing frequency-modulated (FM) radio music. Her obstetrician insisted on keeping the “pain-calmer” music “from distracting the operating staff.” Seventy-seven years ago, this story made newspaper headlines nationwide. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
Allen and Pauline Siegel of Chicago, Illinois, seem elated in 1941 following the successful Caesarean-section delivery of their son by obstetrician Edward L. Cornell, as performed “under local anesthesia.” During the procedure, the 29-yr-old mother listened to soothing frequency-modulated (FM) radio music. Her obstetrician insisted on keeping the “pain-calmer” music “from distracting the operating staff.” Seventy-seven years ago, this story made newspaper headlines nationwide. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
Allen and Pauline Siegel of Chicago, Illinois, seem elated in 1941 following the successful Caesarean-section delivery of their son by obstetrician Edward L. Cornell, as performed “under local anesthesia.” During the procedure, the 29-yr-old mother listened to soothing frequency-modulated (FM) radio music. Her obstetrician insisted on keeping the “pain-calmer” music “from distracting the operating staff.” Seventy-seven years ago, this story made newspaper headlines nationwide. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
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