Free
Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum  |   February 2019
Hazard a Swig? The Coca Wine of the Hazards
Article Information
Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum
Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum   |   February 2019
Hazard a Swig? The Coca Wine of the Hazards
Anesthesiology 2 2019, Vol.130, 185. doi:https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000002609
Anesthesiology 2 2019, Vol.130, 185. doi:https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000002609
As “Family and Dispensing Chemists,” the Hazard family distributed an advertising card (left) for Coca Wine, a mixture of the cocaine from coca leaves (upper right) with wine. From their offices in Rhode Island and New York, the Hazards’ “Erythroxylon Coca” was labeled (lower right) as “An agreeable Stimulant & Tonic for the Brain Nerves and Stomach.” Adults were directed to drink a “Wineglass Full at or after Meals” and “Children one Half the dose.” Laced with cocaine, such wines and subsequent carbonated beverages became so socially available that cocaine anesthetics were rapidly accepted by clinicians and by the public as anesthesia using a familiar drug. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
As “Family and Dispensing Chemists,” the Hazard family distributed an advertising card (left) for Coca Wine, a mixture of the cocaine from coca leaves (upper right) with wine. From their offices in Rhode Island and New York, the Hazards’ “Erythroxylon Coca” was labeled (lower right) as “An agreeable Stimulant & Tonic for the Brain Nerves and Stomach.” Adults were directed to drink a “Wineglass Full at or after Meals” and “Children one Half the dose.” Laced with cocaine, such wines and subsequent carbonated beverages became so socially available that cocaine anesthetics were rapidly accepted by clinicians and by the public as anesthesia using a familiar drug. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
As “Family and Dispensing Chemists,” the Hazard family distributed an advertising card (left) for Coca Wine, a mixture of the cocaine from coca leaves (upper right) with wine. From their offices in Rhode Island and New York, the Hazards’ “Erythroxylon Coca” was labeled (lower right) as “An agreeable Stimulant & Tonic for the Brain Nerves and Stomach.” Adults were directed to drink a “Wineglass Full at or after Meals” and “Children one Half the dose.” Laced with cocaine, such wines and subsequent carbonated beverages became so socially available that cocaine anesthetics were rapidly accepted by clinicians and by the public as anesthesia using a familiar drug. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
×
George S. Bause, M.D., M.P.H., Honorary Curator and Laureate of the History of Anesthesia, Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology, Schaumburg, Illinois, and Clinical Associate Professor, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. UJYC@aol.com.
As “Family and Dispensing Chemists,” the Hazard family distributed an advertising card (left) for Coca Wine, a mixture of the cocaine from coca leaves (upper right) with wine. From their offices in Rhode Island and New York, the Hazards’ “Erythroxylon Coca” was labeled (lower right) as “An agreeable Stimulant & Tonic for the Brain Nerves and Stomach.” Adults were directed to drink a “Wineglass Full at or after Meals” and “Children one Half the dose.” Laced with cocaine, such wines and subsequent carbonated beverages became so socially available that cocaine anesthetics were rapidly accepted by clinicians and by the public as anesthesia using a familiar drug. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
As “Family and Dispensing Chemists,” the Hazard family distributed an advertising card (left) for Coca Wine, a mixture of the cocaine from coca leaves (upper right) with wine. From their offices in Rhode Island and New York, the Hazards’ “Erythroxylon Coca” was labeled (lower right) as “An agreeable Stimulant & Tonic for the Brain Nerves and Stomach.” Adults were directed to drink a “Wineglass Full at or after Meals” and “Children one Half the dose.” Laced with cocaine, such wines and subsequent carbonated beverages became so socially available that cocaine anesthetics were rapidly accepted by clinicians and by the public as anesthesia using a familiar drug. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
As “Family and Dispensing Chemists,” the Hazard family distributed an advertising card (left) for Coca Wine, a mixture of the cocaine from coca leaves (upper right) with wine. From their offices in Rhode Island and New York, the Hazards’ “Erythroxylon Coca” was labeled (lower right) as “An agreeable Stimulant & Tonic for the Brain Nerves and Stomach.” Adults were directed to drink a “Wineglass Full at or after Meals” and “Children one Half the dose.” Laced with cocaine, such wines and subsequent carbonated beverages became so socially available that cocaine anesthetics were rapidly accepted by clinicians and by the public as anesthesia using a familiar drug. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
×