Editorial Views  |   February 2019
Where’s the Beef?: How Much Can We Skimp on Pharmacokinetic–Pharmacodynamic Data?
Author Notes
  • From the Department of Anesthesiology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO (T.K.H.); Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO (T.K.H.); and Department of Anesthesiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands (E.O.).
  • Corresponding article on page 213.
    Corresponding article on page 213.×
  • Accepted for publication November 7, 2018.
    Accepted for publication November 7, 2018.×
  • Address correspondence to Dr. Henthorn: thomas.henthorn@ucdenver.edu
Article Information
Editorial Views
Editorial Views   |   February 2019
Where’s the Beef?: How Much Can We Skimp on Pharmacokinetic–Pharmacodynamic Data?
Anesthesiology 2 2019, Vol.130, 186-188. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002552
Anesthesiology 2 2019, Vol.130, 186-188. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002552
Pharmacokinetic–pharmacodynamic models have been used extensively in clinical pharmacology to move beyond the dose–response relationship to more directly relate drug concentrations to drug effects.1,2  Pharmacokinetic–pharmacodynamic studies require plasma (or other relevant fluid) drug concentration measurements to characterize the pharmacokinetics as well as drug effect measurements, usually including onset and offset of the effect, to characterize the pharmacodynamics.
Use of pharmacokinetic–pharmacodynamic studies rather than dose–response studies is especially prominent in anesthesiology research, because anesthesia providers require the additional information about the time delay between attainment of plasma drug concentrations and their corresponding drug effects, and this information is not obtainable with a mere dose–response study.3  To fully capture this time delay (or hysteresis), pharmacokinetic–pharmacodynamic studies of anesthetic drugs require frequent plasma drug concentration measurements and drug effect measurements during both the onset and offset limbs of drug effect. This usually translates to obtaining both drug concentration and drug effect measurements during a drug infusion and for some time after discontinuing drug administration.