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Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum  |   October 2018
Ohmeda Slide Rule for Pressures and Volumes
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Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum
Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum   |   October 2018
Ohmeda Slide Rule for Pressures and Volumes
Anesthesiology 10 2018, Vol.129, 790. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002448
Anesthesiology 10 2018, Vol.129, 790. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002448
For decades, clinicians have appreciated shortcuts for calculating numbers and for converting units of measure. In both surgical and critical care suites, some “seasoned” anesthesiologists and intensivists appreciated using handy slide rules for a host of patient- and apparatus-related tasks. Assisted by this Ohmeda slide rule (upper image), one learned that 150 mmHg equals 20 kPa. On the back (lower image), a tidal volume of 700 ml at a respiratory rate of 10 per min was slide rule–calculated as having a 7 l/min minute volume. The Cleveland-based company founded in 1910 as “Ohio Chemical” shifted its corporate headquarters to Madison, Wisconsin, in 1946. Yet, starting in 1967, the firm still called itself Ohio Medical Products. By 1984 the Wisconsin-based company finally shelved the name “Ohio” and rebranded itself as “Ohmeda.” And by then, calculators, computers, and digitization had combined to make handheld slide rules, like this one, largely obsolete. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
For decades, clinicians have appreciated shortcuts for calculating numbers and for converting units of measure. In both surgical and critical care suites, some “seasoned” anesthesiologists and intensivists appreciated using handy slide rules for a host of patient- and apparatus-related tasks. Assisted by this Ohmeda slide rule (upper image), one learned that 150 mmHg equals 20 kPa. On the back (lower image), a tidal volume of 700 ml at a respiratory rate of 10 per min was slide rule–calculated as having a 7 l/min minute volume. The Cleveland-based company founded in 1910 as “Ohio Chemical” shifted its corporate headquarters to Madison, Wisconsin, in 1946. Yet, starting in 1967, the firm still called itself Ohio Medical Products. By 1984 the Wisconsin-based company finally shelved the name “Ohio” and rebranded itself as “Ohmeda.” And by then, calculators, computers, and digitization had combined to make handheld slide rules, like this one, largely obsolete. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
For decades, clinicians have appreciated shortcuts for calculating numbers and for converting units of measure. In both surgical and critical care suites, some “seasoned” anesthesiologists and intensivists appreciated using handy slide rules for a host of patient- and apparatus-related tasks. Assisted by this Ohmeda slide rule (upper image), one learned that 150 mmHg equals 20 kPa. On the back (lower image), a tidal volume of 700 ml at a respiratory rate of 10 per min was slide rule–calculated as having a 7 l/min minute volume. The Cleveland-based company founded in 1910 as “Ohio Chemical” shifted its corporate headquarters to Madison, Wisconsin, in 1946. Yet, starting in 1967, the firm still called itself Ohio Medical Products. By 1984 the Wisconsin-based company finally shelved the name “Ohio” and rebranded itself as “Ohmeda.” And by then, calculators, computers, and digitization had combined to make handheld slide rules, like this one, largely obsolete. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
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George S. Bause, M.D., M.P.H., Honorary Curator and Laureate of the History of Anesthesia, Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology, Schaumburg, Illinois, and Clinical Associate Professor, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. UJYC@aol.com.
For decades, clinicians have appreciated shortcuts for calculating numbers and for converting units of measure. In both surgical and critical care suites, some “seasoned” anesthesiologists and intensivists appreciated using handy slide rules for a host of patient- and apparatus-related tasks. Assisted by this Ohmeda slide rule (upper image), one learned that 150 mmHg equals 20 kPa. On the back (lower image), a tidal volume of 700 ml at a respiratory rate of 10 per min was slide rule–calculated as having a 7 l/min minute volume. The Cleveland-based company founded in 1910 as “Ohio Chemical” shifted its corporate headquarters to Madison, Wisconsin, in 1946. Yet, starting in 1967, the firm still called itself Ohio Medical Products. By 1984 the Wisconsin-based company finally shelved the name “Ohio” and rebranded itself as “Ohmeda.” And by then, calculators, computers, and digitization had combined to make handheld slide rules, like this one, largely obsolete. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
For decades, clinicians have appreciated shortcuts for calculating numbers and for converting units of measure. In both surgical and critical care suites, some “seasoned” anesthesiologists and intensivists appreciated using handy slide rules for a host of patient- and apparatus-related tasks. Assisted by this Ohmeda slide rule (upper image), one learned that 150 mmHg equals 20 kPa. On the back (lower image), a tidal volume of 700 ml at a respiratory rate of 10 per min was slide rule–calculated as having a 7 l/min minute volume. The Cleveland-based company founded in 1910 as “Ohio Chemical” shifted its corporate headquarters to Madison, Wisconsin, in 1946. Yet, starting in 1967, the firm still called itself Ohio Medical Products. By 1984 the Wisconsin-based company finally shelved the name “Ohio” and rebranded itself as “Ohmeda.” And by then, calculators, computers, and digitization had combined to make handheld slide rules, like this one, largely obsolete. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
For decades, clinicians have appreciated shortcuts for calculating numbers and for converting units of measure. In both surgical and critical care suites, some “seasoned” anesthesiologists and intensivists appreciated using handy slide rules for a host of patient- and apparatus-related tasks. Assisted by this Ohmeda slide rule (upper image), one learned that 150 mmHg equals 20 kPa. On the back (lower image), a tidal volume of 700 ml at a respiratory rate of 10 per min was slide rule–calculated as having a 7 l/min minute volume. The Cleveland-based company founded in 1910 as “Ohio Chemical” shifted its corporate headquarters to Madison, Wisconsin, in 1946. Yet, starting in 1967, the firm still called itself Ohio Medical Products. By 1984 the Wisconsin-based company finally shelved the name “Ohio” and rebranded itself as “Ohmeda.” And by then, calculators, computers, and digitization had combined to make handheld slide rules, like this one, largely obsolete. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
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