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Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum  |   October 2018
From Horse to Hearse: Tragedy Strikes Laughing-gas Dentist Charles Henry Neall
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Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum
Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum   |   October 2018
From Horse to Hearse: Tragedy Strikes Laughing-gas Dentist Charles Henry Neall
Anesthesiology 10 2018, Vol.129, 622. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002445
Anesthesiology 10 2018, Vol.129, 622. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002445
From the Wood Library-Museum’s Ben Z. Swanson Collection, this trade card’s red rose conceals the drawn bow of Cupid. The young god or at least his bow seems bent on drawing Philadelphians to the Vine Street dental office of Dr. Charles Henry Neall (1834 to 1890), where laughing gas was administered for anesthesia. Unfortunately, Cupid could not rescue the portly Dr. Neall from dying while vacationing on tour. After his carriage had broken an axle and his horse had bolted, Dr. Neall had fallen, “striking on his head.” According to the Altoona Times, the dentist’s massive girth “made his fall all the more severe” and doomed him to a terminal “concussion of the brain.” (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
From the Wood Library-Museum’s Ben Z. Swanson Collection, this trade card’s red rose conceals the drawn bow of Cupid. The young god or at least his bow seems bent on drawing Philadelphians to the Vine Street dental office of Dr. Charles Henry Neall (1834 to 1890), where laughing gas was administered for anesthesia. Unfortunately, Cupid could not rescue the portly Dr. Neall from dying while vacationing on tour. After his carriage had broken an axle and his horse had bolted, Dr. Neall had fallen, “striking on his head.” According to the Altoona Times, the dentist’s massive girth “made his fall all the more severe” and doomed him to a terminal “concussion of the brain.” (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
From the Wood Library-Museum’s Ben Z. Swanson Collection, this trade card’s red rose conceals the drawn bow of Cupid. The young god or at least his bow seems bent on drawing Philadelphians to the Vine Street dental office of Dr. Charles Henry Neall (1834 to 1890), where laughing gas was administered for anesthesia. Unfortunately, Cupid could not rescue the portly Dr. Neall from dying while vacationing on tour. After his carriage had broken an axle and his horse had bolted, Dr. Neall had fallen, “striking on his head.” According to the Altoona Times, the dentist’s massive girth “made his fall all the more severe” and doomed him to a terminal “concussion of the brain.” (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
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George S. Bause, M.D., M.P.H., Honorary Curator and Laureate of the History of Anesthesia, Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology, Schaumburg, Illinois, and Clinical Associate Professor, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. UJYC@aol.com.
From the Wood Library-Museum’s Ben Z. Swanson Collection, this trade card’s red rose conceals the drawn bow of Cupid. The young god or at least his bow seems bent on drawing Philadelphians to the Vine Street dental office of Dr. Charles Henry Neall (1834 to 1890), where laughing gas was administered for anesthesia. Unfortunately, Cupid could not rescue the portly Dr. Neall from dying while vacationing on tour. After his carriage had broken an axle and his horse had bolted, Dr. Neall had fallen, “striking on his head.” According to the Altoona Times, the dentist’s massive girth “made his fall all the more severe” and doomed him to a terminal “concussion of the brain.” (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
From the Wood Library-Museum’s Ben Z. Swanson Collection, this trade card’s red rose conceals the drawn bow of Cupid. The young god or at least his bow seems bent on drawing Philadelphians to the Vine Street dental office of Dr. Charles Henry Neall (1834 to 1890), where laughing gas was administered for anesthesia. Unfortunately, Cupid could not rescue the portly Dr. Neall from dying while vacationing on tour. After his carriage had broken an axle and his horse had bolted, Dr. Neall had fallen, “striking on his head.” According to the Altoona Times, the dentist’s massive girth “made his fall all the more severe” and doomed him to a terminal “concussion of the brain.” (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
From the Wood Library-Museum’s Ben Z. Swanson Collection, this trade card’s red rose conceals the drawn bow of Cupid. The young god or at least his bow seems bent on drawing Philadelphians to the Vine Street dental office of Dr. Charles Henry Neall (1834 to 1890), where laughing gas was administered for anesthesia. Unfortunately, Cupid could not rescue the portly Dr. Neall from dying while vacationing on tour. After his carriage had broken an axle and his horse had bolted, Dr. Neall had fallen, “striking on his head.” According to the Altoona Times, the dentist’s massive girth “made his fall all the more severe” and doomed him to a terminal “concussion of the brain.” (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
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