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Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum  |   August 2018
Coca Bitters—Numbing the Fatigue Rather Than the Pain
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Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum
Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum   |   August 2018
Coca Bitters—Numbing the Fatigue Rather Than the Pain
Anesthesiology 8 2018, Vol.129, 234. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002358
Anesthesiology 8 2018, Vol.129, 234. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002358
Historically, the debilitating, recurring fevers of malaria were remedied with cinchona (quinine vs. shivering) and coca (cocaine vs. fatigue)—botanically, a bark and a leaf, respectively. However, quinine has direct antimalarial properties, which coca lacks. This reality did not prevent New York City’s Quichua [sic] Coca Company from falsely advertising the malaria-fighting powers of pharmaceuticals and beverages mixed with the company’s Coca Bitters. The printer’s proof (above) of the logo for those bitters trademarked a presumably cocaine-driven Quechuan Amerindian hiking through Peruvian jungle carting a seated man whose chair was lashed to the tireless porter’s forehead and waist. So, 5 yr before Karl Koller’s research on the numbing properties of topical cocaine, Coca Bitters were peddled in 1879 as socially acceptable stimulants for numbing the effects of fatigue. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
Historically, the debilitating, recurring fevers of malaria were remedied with cinchona (quinine vs. shivering) and coca (cocaine vs. fatigue)—botanically, a bark and a leaf, respectively. However, quinine has direct antimalarial properties, which coca lacks. This reality did not prevent New York City’s Quichua [sic] Coca Company from falsely advertising the malaria-fighting powers of pharmaceuticals and beverages mixed with the company’s Coca Bitters. The printer’s proof (above) of the logo for those bitters trademarked a presumably cocaine-driven Quechuan Amerindian hiking through Peruvian jungle carting a seated man whose chair was lashed to the tireless porter’s forehead and waist. So, 5 yr before Karl Koller’s research on the numbing properties of topical cocaine, Coca Bitters were peddled in 1879 as socially acceptable stimulants for numbing the effects of fatigue. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
Historically, the debilitating, recurring fevers of malaria were remedied with cinchona (quinine vs. shivering) and coca (cocaine vs. fatigue)—botanically, a bark and a leaf, respectively. However, quinine has direct antimalarial properties, which coca lacks. This reality did not prevent New York City’s Quichua [sic] Coca Company from falsely advertising the malaria-fighting powers of pharmaceuticals and beverages mixed with the company’s Coca Bitters. The printer’s proof (above) of the logo for those bitters trademarked a presumably cocaine-driven Quechuan Amerindian hiking through Peruvian jungle carting a seated man whose chair was lashed to the tireless porter’s forehead and waist. So, 5 yr before Karl Koller’s research on the numbing properties of topical cocaine, Coca Bitters were peddled in 1879 as socially acceptable stimulants for numbing the effects of fatigue. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
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George S. Bause, M.D., M.P.H., Honorary Curator and Laureate of the History of Anesthesia, Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology, Schaumburg, Illinois, and Clinical Associate Professor, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. UJYC@aol.com.
Historically, the debilitating, recurring fevers of malaria were remedied with cinchona (quinine vs. shivering) and coca (cocaine vs. fatigue)—botanically, a bark and a leaf, respectively. However, quinine has direct antimalarial properties, which coca lacks. This reality did not prevent New York City’s Quichua [sic] Coca Company from falsely advertising the malaria-fighting powers of pharmaceuticals and beverages mixed with the company’s Coca Bitters. The printer’s proof (above) of the logo for those bitters trademarked a presumably cocaine-driven Quechuan Amerindian hiking through Peruvian jungle carting a seated man whose chair was lashed to the tireless porter’s forehead and waist. So, 5 yr before Karl Koller’s research on the numbing properties of topical cocaine, Coca Bitters were peddled in 1879 as socially acceptable stimulants for numbing the effects of fatigue. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
Historically, the debilitating, recurring fevers of malaria were remedied with cinchona (quinine vs. shivering) and coca (cocaine vs. fatigue)—botanically, a bark and a leaf, respectively. However, quinine has direct antimalarial properties, which coca lacks. This reality did not prevent New York City’s Quichua [sic] Coca Company from falsely advertising the malaria-fighting powers of pharmaceuticals and beverages mixed with the company’s Coca Bitters. The printer’s proof (above) of the logo for those bitters trademarked a presumably cocaine-driven Quechuan Amerindian hiking through Peruvian jungle carting a seated man whose chair was lashed to the tireless porter’s forehead and waist. So, 5 yr before Karl Koller’s research on the numbing properties of topical cocaine, Coca Bitters were peddled in 1879 as socially acceptable stimulants for numbing the effects of fatigue. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
Historically, the debilitating, recurring fevers of malaria were remedied with cinchona (quinine vs. shivering) and coca (cocaine vs. fatigue)—botanically, a bark and a leaf, respectively. However, quinine has direct antimalarial properties, which coca lacks. This reality did not prevent New York City’s Quichua [sic] Coca Company from falsely advertising the malaria-fighting powers of pharmaceuticals and beverages mixed with the company’s Coca Bitters. The printer’s proof (above) of the logo for those bitters trademarked a presumably cocaine-driven Quechuan Amerindian hiking through Peruvian jungle carting a seated man whose chair was lashed to the tireless porter’s forehead and waist. So, 5 yr before Karl Koller’s research on the numbing properties of topical cocaine, Coca Bitters were peddled in 1879 as socially acceptable stimulants for numbing the effects of fatigue. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
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