Newly Published
Mind to Mind  |   May 2019
Why We Write
Author Notes
  • From the Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Management, University of Texas Southwestern School of Medicine, Dallas, Texas. james.berry@utsw.edu
  • Accepted for publication April 3, 2019.
    Accepted for publication April 3, 2019.×
Article Information
Mind to Mind
Mind to Mind   |   May 2019
Why We Write
Anesthesiology Newly Published on May 10, 2019. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002782
Anesthesiology Newly Published on May 10, 2019. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002782
It seems an incredible exercise of ego for me to assume that some random thought I might choose to record would be of any interest to others, yet we (as a species) have, historically, an incredible predisposition to write things down. From early pictographs to virtual blogs, humans are driven to document their experiences. Is it a bid for immortality, defying our transient, miniscule presence in this world, or is it truly philanthropic, hoping that someone might benefit from our experiences, our stories, and our mistakes? Do we write for ourselves or for others?
For a few it is like a compulsion. I personally do not enjoy the process—it is painful to struggle with a keyboard, and the dictation option, as easy as it should be, is still not quite viable. Perhaps the presence of an expectant-looking microphone, along with the unbearable urge to edit on the fly, interrupts a smooth flow of thought. I have tried the “purge” approach, dumping words on a page, hoping to find some thread of continuity to link it all together, but it only rarely leads to coherent results. It is uncommon and unpredictable; but, a few special times, the words flow without thought or effort, seemingly originating outside my awareness or control.