Newly Published
Mind to Mind  |   May 2019
My Personal Tryst with Ketamine Anesthesia
Author Notes
  • From the Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine, Augusta University, Augusta, Georgia. Sagarwal@augusta.edu
  • Accepted for publication April 3, 2019.
    Accepted for publication April 3, 2019.×
Article Information
Mind to Mind
Mind to Mind   |   May 2019
My Personal Tryst with Ketamine Anesthesia
Anesthesiology Newly Published on May 10, 2019. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002770
Anesthesiology Newly Published on May 10, 2019. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002770
I spent a recent Saturday afternoon in the emergency department for an exceptionally painful thrombosed hemorrhoid. Because the operating rooms were unavailable, the surgeon suggested that he could make the small nick necessary to drain the clot in the emergency department procedure room with an emergency department physician serving as the anesthesia provider. As I was not technically non per os, having had water and a few raw carrots, the emergency department team decided to use ketamine for my anesthetic. The unpleasant side effects of ketamine are something I am well acquainted with as I have been a practicing physician anesthesiologist for nearly two decades. I therefore requested that midazolam be administered before the ketamine; however, as I was to learn later, my reasonable request was rejected because of an unreasonable fear of aspiration.