Newly Published
Images in Anesthesiology  |   April 2019
Gigantic Pericardial Bronchogenic Cyst Compressing Superior Vena Cava and Coronary Artery
Author Notes
  • From the Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky (C.P., C.B.Z., J.H.), and the Department of Anesthesiology, Jewish Hospital, Louisville, Kentucky (J.H.).
  • Correspondence: Address correspondence to Dr. Huang: jiapenghuang@yahoo.com
Article Information
Images in Anesthesiology / Cardiovascular Anesthesia / Pediatric Anesthesia / Respiratory System
Images in Anesthesiology   |   April 2019
Gigantic Pericardial Bronchogenic Cyst Compressing Superior Vena Cava and Coronary Artery
Anesthesiology Newly Published on April 16, 2019. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002739
Anesthesiology Newly Published on April 16, 2019. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002739
A 41-yr-old male with intermittent chest pain presented for resection of a pericardial mass. Transesophageal echocardiography showed dramatic compression of the superior vena cava (SVC) to less than 2 mm (panel A), significant obliteration of the right pulmonary artery, and intermittent collapse of the left main coronary artery (panel B). Pathologic diagnosis was consistent with bronchogenic cyst.
Bronchogenic cysts are relatively rare in adults, and most of these cysts are located within the mediastinum. Presenting symptoms vary significantly based on location and size, ranging from asymptomatic to symptoms due to compression of adjacent structures.1  Echocardiography played a pivotal role in the diagnosis and management of pericardial cysts to identify which crucial structures are being compressed and what the expected hemodynamic and airway consequences are in the perioperative period.2