Newly Published
Images in Anesthesiology  |   January 2019
An Unlikely Airway Foreign Body: Diagnosis, Treatment, and Prevention
Author Notes
  • From the Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (S.L., C.L., E.K.); and the University of Arizona College of Medicine, Tucson, Arizona (A.T.).
  • Part of the work presented in this article has been presented as a case abstract at the Society of Pediatric Anesthesia Spring Meeting in Phoenix, Arizona, March 24, 2018.
    Part of the work presented in this article has been presented as a case abstract at the Society of Pediatric Anesthesia Spring Meeting in Phoenix, Arizona, March 24, 2018.×
  • Correspondence: Address correspondence to Dr. Le: sale@chla.usc.edu
Article Information
Images in Anesthesiology / Airway Management / Respiratory System / Technology / Equipment / Monitoring
Images in Anesthesiology   |   January 2019
An Unlikely Airway Foreign Body: Diagnosis, Treatment, and Prevention
Anesthesiology Newly Published on January 23, 2019. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002543
Anesthesiology Newly Published on January 23, 2019. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002543
Tracheal foreign bodies are common pediatric airway emergencies. Delays in diagnosis can lead to threatening airway complications. However, diagnosis is challenging, given that up to 52% of patients can have normal chest x-rays.1 
Compared with seeds and nuts, a closed catheter suction system as a tracheal foreign body is a rare occurrence.1,2  We present images of a bronchoscopy and retrieval of a 12-cm distal portion of a closed catheter suction system as shown in the image on the left that was undiagnosed for 7 days until the patient was turned prone for surgery. The broken fragment is shown with an intact closed catheter suction system for comparison in the image on the right.