Education  |   March 2019
Nitric Oxide Story
Author Notes
  • From the Anesthesia Center for Critical Care Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts.
  • Submitted for publication August 30, 2018. Accepted for publication November 12, 2018.
    Submitted for publication August 30, 2018. Accepted for publication November 12, 2018.×
  • Address correspondence to Dr. Zapol: Anesthesia Center for Critical Care Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02114. wzapol@mgh.harvard.edu. Information on purchasing reprints may be found at www.anesthesiology.org or on the masthead page at the beginning of this issue. Anesthesiology’s articles are made freely accessible to all readers, for personal use only, 6 months from the cover date of the issue.
Article Information
Education / Cardiovascular Anesthesia / Pediatric Anesthesia / Respiratory System
Education   |   March 2019
Nitric Oxide Story
Anesthesiology 3 2019, Vol.130, 435-440. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002579
Anesthesiology 3 2019, Vol.130, 435-440. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002579
Abstract

Inhaled Nitric Oxide in Persistent Pulmonary Hypertension of the Newborn. By Roberts JD, Polaner DM, Lang P, and Zapol WM. Lancet 1992; 130:435–40. Reprinted with permission.

NO has vasodilatory effects on the pulmonary vasculature in adults and animals. We examined the effects on systemic oxygenation and blood pressure of inhaling up to 80 parts per million by volume of NO at fraction of inspired oxygen 0.9 for up to 30 min by six infants with persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn. In all infants, this treatment rapidly and significantly increased preductal oxygen saturation; in five infants, postductal oxygen saturation and oxygen tensions also increased. Inhalation of NO did not cause systemic hypotension or raise methemoglobin. These data suggest that low levels of inhaled NO have an important role in the reversal of hypoxemia due to persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn.