Newly Published
Review Article  |   January 2019
Operating Room Fires
Author Notes
  • From the Departments of Surgery (T.S.J., T.N.R., E.L.J.) and Anesthesiology (I.H.B.), the University of Colorado and the Denver Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Denver, Colorado.
  • Submitted for publication January 5, 2018. Accepted for publication October 5, 2018.
    Submitted for publication January 5, 2018. Accepted for publication October 5, 2018.×
  • Correspondence: Address correspondence to Dr. Jones: 1055 Clermont St, #112, Denver, Colorado, 80220. Edward.Jones@UCDenver.edu. Information on purchasing reprints may be found at www.anesthesiology.org or on the masthead page at the beginning of this issue. Anesthesiology’s articles are made freely accessible to all readers, for personal use only, 6 months from the cover date of the issue.
Article Information
Review Article / Patient Safety
Review Article   |   January 2019
Operating Room Fires
Anesthesiology Newly Published on January 11, 2019. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002598
Anesthesiology Newly Published on January 11, 2019. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002598
Abstract

Operating room fires are rare but devastating events. Guidelines are available for the prevention and management of surgical fires; however, these recommendations are based on expert opinion and case series. The three components of an operating room fire are present in virtually all surgical procedures: an oxidizer (oxygen, nitrous oxide), an ignition source (i.e., laser, “Bovie”), and a fuel. This review analyzes each fire ingredient to determine the optimal clinical strategy to reduce the risk of fire. Surgical checklists, team training, and the specific management of an operating room fire are also reviewed.