Newly Published
Editorial Views  |   November 2018
Succinylcholine and Dantrolene: Inseparable in the Emergency Cupboard?
Author Notes
  • From the Malignant Hyperthermia Unit, St. James's University Hospital, Leeds, United Kingdom; and the Institute of Medical Research at St. James’s, University of Leeds, Leeds, United Kingdom.
  • Corresponding article on page XXX.
    Corresponding article on page XXX.×
  • Accepted for publication October 8, 2018.
    Accepted for publication October 8, 2018.×
  • Correspondence: Address correspondence to Dr. Hopkins: p.m.hopkins@leeds.ac.uk
Article Information
Editorial Views / Neuromuscular Diseases and Drugs / Pharmacology
Editorial Views   |   November 2018
Succinylcholine and Dantrolene: Inseparable in the Emergency Cupboard?
Anesthesiology Newly Published on November 12, 2018. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002507
Anesthesiology Newly Published on November 12, 2018. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002507
IN this issue, Larach et al.1  conclude a large database analysis and systematic review by advocating that dantrolene be stocked in all locations where succinylcholine is available, even if volatile anesthetics are not. The premise for the analysis is that if succinylcholine is used in such locations (e.g., for airway rescue or routinely for electroconvulsive therapy), and succinylcholine without volatile anesthetics can trigger a malignant hyperthermia (MH) reaction that requires dantrolene to be immediately available, then dantrolene should be stocked at these locations. The authors did not conduct a health economic analysis of the cost benefit of stocking dantrolene in this context, instead referring to a previous health economic analysis of the wider question of whether it is cost-effective to stock dantrolene in ambulatory surgery centers where any MH–triggering drug is likely to be available.2