Editorial Views  |   December 2018
Observing Blood Management Programs through the Retrospectroscope
Author Notes
  • From the Department of Statistics and Actuarial Science, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada (R.J.C.); and the Department of Anesthesia and Perioperative Care, University of California, San Francisco, California (R.B.W.).
  • Corresponding article on page 1082.
    Corresponding article on page 1082.×
  • Accepted for publication September 10, 2018.
    Accepted for publication September 10, 2018.×
  • Address correspondence to Dr. Weiskopf: rbw@theweiskopfgroup.com
Article Information
Editorial Views / Coagulation and Transfusion / Critical Care / Quality Improvement
Editorial Views   |   December 2018
Observing Blood Management Programs through the Retrospectroscope
Anesthesiology 12 2018, Vol.129, 1060-1062. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002477
Anesthesiology 12 2018, Vol.129, 1060-1062. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002477
IN this issue of Anesthesiology, Gupta et al.1  report on the results of a retrospective cohort study comparing transfusion practices and clinical outcomes before and after the implementation of a blood management program in orthopedic surgery at a single center. The motivation stems in part from interest in reducing the number of transfusions by the use of more restrictive hemoglobin triggers for red blood cell transfusions in orthopedic surgery patients. The authors observe that both lower utilization and comparable or improved patient outcomes followed implementation of the blood management program and conclude that a “hemoglobin threshold of 7 g/dl appears to be safe for many orthopedic patients.” There is a clear need to understand the relationship between transfusion triggers and outcomes to ensure that limited resources are used judiciously, to minimize exposures of patients, and to optimize patient outcomes.