Reviews of Educational Material  |   November 2018
Anesthesia: The Gift of Oblivion and the Mystery of Consciousness.
Author Notes
  • Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut.llichtor@me.com
  • Accepted for publication June 13, 2018.
    Accepted for publication June 13, 2018.×
Article Information
Reviews of Educational Material / Central and Peripheral Nervous Systems
Reviews of Educational Material   |   November 2018
Anesthesia: The Gift of Oblivion and the Mystery of Consciousness.
Anesthesiology 11 2018, Vol.129, 1052. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002369
Anesthesiology 11 2018, Vol.129, 1052. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002369
When I started reading this book, I thought it was going to be a story about anesthesia. Instead, it is a book mostly about the lack of anesthesia among patients undergoing surgery; that is, it is a story of intraoperative awareness. The author lives in Melbourne, Australia, and has described her visits and the studies of some of the individuals around the world who have investigated anesthesia recall, including: Kate Leslie, M.B.B.S., M.D., M.Epid., M.Hlth.Serv.Mt., F.A.N.Z.C.A., F.A.H.M.S., of the University of Melbourne (Melbourne, Victoria, Australia); J. Edmond I. Eger, II, M.D., since deceased, labeled by the author as the “most famous anesthesiologist in the world,” who introduced minimum alveolar concentration and how it possibly relates to recall; and George Mashour, M.D., Ph.D., of the University of Michigan (Ann Arbor, Michigan). She also interviewed, and described the horrible observations of, some patients who experienced intraoperative awareness.