Correspondence  |   November 2018
In Reply
Author Notes
  • Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (R.A.S.). rebecca.schroeder@duke.edu
  • (Accepted for publication July 30, 2018.)
    (Accepted for publication July 30, 2018.)×
Article Information
Correspondence
Correspondence   |   November 2018
In Reply
Anesthesiology 11 2018, Vol.129, 1050-1051. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002421
Anesthesiology 11 2018, Vol.129, 1050-1051. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002421
We appreciate the response of Rosen et al. to our recent article, “Temporal Trends in Difficult and Failed Tracheal Intubation in a Regional Community Anesthetic Practice,”1  including their highlighting the importance of the anesthesia community as subject matter experts in airway management. We concur with the authors’ assertion that mask ventilation, as the precursor to endotracheal intubation and a critical airway management skill, deserves a similar level of scrutiny and study. Mastery of the technical skill of mask ventilation is absolutely critical to the safe practice of anesthesiology but also to emergency airway management in both pre- and in-hospital settings. Sadly, mask ventilation has historically received less attention in our clinical anesthetic documentation and, consequently, less rigorous investigation.