Correspondence  |   November 2018
Airway Management: The Less Popular Skill of Bag-mask Ventilation
Author Notes
  • Mount Sinai Medical Center of Florida, Miami Beach, Florida (G.P.R.). grosen167@me.com
  • (Accepted for publication July 30, 2018.)
    (Accepted for publication July 30, 2018.)×
Article Information
Correspondence
Correspondence   |   November 2018
Airway Management: The Less Popular Skill of Bag-mask Ventilation
Anesthesiology 11 2018, Vol.129, 1049-1050. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002420
Anesthesiology 11 2018, Vol.129, 1049-1050. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000002420
As anesthesiologists, it is encouraging that recent attention has been paid to airway management improvements in and out of the operating suites. Our goals of positive patient safety outcomes have led to many recent airway management publications. The most recent of which included the investigation of the temporal trends in difficult and failed intubations over a 14-yr period (2002 to 2015) by Schroeder et al.1  in the March 2018 issue of Anesthesiology.
Airway management outcomes have improved through enhanced education, better airway algorithms, and innovations in airway management. Mask ventilation, the precursor to intubation, has unfortunately received minimal attention over the same period. We contend that mask ventilation is as important as intubation, but it is commonly a less popular skill to teach and learn. As airway management experts, we believe it is our duty to educate the healthcare community on the importance of mask ventilation improvement strategies.